Last edited by Samurr
Tuesday, February 11, 2020 | History

15 edition of Life and death in Shanghai found in the catalog.

Life and death in Shanghai

  • 53 Want to read
  • 22 Currently reading

Published by Grove Press in New York .
Written in English

    Places:
  • China
    • Subjects:
    • Cheng, Nien, 1915-,
    • China -- History -- Cultural Revolution, 1966-1976 -- Personal narratives

    • Edition Notes

      StatementNien Cheng.
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsDS778.7 .C445 1987
      The Physical Object
      Paginationix, 547 p. ;
      Number of Pages547
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL2740427M
      ISBN 100394555481
      LC Control Number86045254
      OCLC/WorldCa14716721

      You have done it for them. Even apparently unselfish acts like giving up one's private property or volunteering to do unpleasant work do not prove that one has overcome selfish feelings and loyalties, since they may not necessarily be performed with wholehearted sincerity in the slang of the Cultural Revolution, one may merely be a ''radish'' - red outside, white inside. I see no other books that compared to this book on the subject of the Chinese Cultural Revolution. In America, as in China, independence has been her strong suit.

      Some of them have never recovered. Cheng did her best to understand what lay behind the mindless destructiveness and cold lack of humanity of her Red Guard persecutors. Life and Death in Shanghai really is a story of human resilience. By and large Mrs.

      Hayford, History Dept. After that, the Party relented and let her go free. During her confinement, she was pressured to make a false confession that she was a spy for "the imperialists" because for many years after the death of her husband she had continued to work as a senior partner for Shell in Shanghai. When you admit sincerely that you are indeed guilty. When I'm confronted with a difficult situation, my first reaction is not to get frightened, it's 'Oh, wonderful, here's a situation that really calls on me to do something.


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Life and death in Shanghai book

Everyone is probably, deep inside, to some degree guilty. Showing of 17 next show all This would have to be the most profound book I have read on what it was like to live in Communist China during the Mao Tze-tung years. Why so much official time and energy was being invested in her case she could not understand; only years later, as the full extent of the intrigue and back-stabbing within the party and the army emerged, did it become clear that her confession was intended to be part of a power play put together by the faction supporting Defense Minister Lin Biao against Premier Zhou Enlai.

Cheng did her best to understand what lay behind the mindless destructiveness and cold lack of humanity of her Red Guard persecutors. Not even once. According to Mao's theory of the soul, as far as we can infer it ''soul'' is, of course, not a word Mao usedthere exist in all human beings not only crudely selfish impulses like greed, but also more insidiously antisocial feelings like friendship or the longing for happiness, and antisocial loyalties like commitment to abstract truth.

But then, I would have been a loser, as I kept stalling my review of Life and Death in Shanghai because I was in immense awe of Nien Cheng and doubted whether I could do justice to this extremely important book.

And neither did Nien Cheng. It's a crime against socialism. The last fifty pages of Life and Death deny its chances of perfection. According to the Constitution, women and men enjoyed equal rights, but in practice there was great discrimination against women.

We read this, not so much for historical analysis, but, like the literature of the Gulag in Russia, for an example of a humane spirit telling terrible truths honestly, without bitterness or cynicism.

So was the watermelon, brought from Persia over the silk route. But even after being set free, she was spied on round-the-clock by the Party often obliging her own relatives to spy on herhence she decided to leave the country once and for all.

By and large Mrs.

Quick Rules:

Now who is acting for the Kuomintang? The bustling metropolis was home to sophisticated intellectuals, entrepreneurs, and a thriving middle class when Mao's proletarian revolution emerged victorious from the long civil war.

All these facts were seen as disloyal during the Cultural Revolution. Inonly the merest rumblings of political upheaval disturbed the gracious life of the author, widow of the manager of Shell Petroleum in China.

Our conversations varied very little from the first occasion. When the political climate softened, and she was released, Cheng learned that her fears were justified: Meiping had been beaten to death when she refused to denounce her mother. In addition, she had many international friendships and relationships.

In addition to reading about the author's life, you will receive excellent information about the workings of the Communist Party and the continual shifts of power within the leadership and how this affected the Chinese people in their daily lives. But explanations that rely heavily on Mao's paranoia or Jiang's pathological vindictiveness, or on infighting within the party's upper hierarchy, do not do justice to the historical scale of the Cultural Revolution itself, which seemed to proclaim that a process of revolution without end was begun in China - with the youth of the country, and whoever else had least stake in the status quo, henceforth forever at war with whatever was stable in society.

During the weeks of harassment that followed, Mrs. Very likely she had been murdered. Cheng, as though there was no choice to be made. Cheng's bilingual skills were invaluable to the organization and she soon filled in for the general manager.

And indeed, as we read the debates between her and her interrogators, the antagonists do seem to be speaking different languages. Finally, if I have to point out at least one good thing that happened due to The Cultural Revolution, it would be On balance she is probably right.Life and Death in Shanghai Homework Help Questions.

How has Nien Cheng's Life and Death in Shanghai helped us to understand China during the Culture. This summary of Life and Death in Shanghai includes a complete plot overview – spoilers included!

Life and Death in Shanghai Book Review

We’re considering expanding this synopsis into a full-length study guide to deepen your comprehension of the book and why it's important. Mar 12,  · Life and Death in Shanghai by Nien Cheng [Book Review] You need to read this book. This is isn’t made up. It’s a real account of a Nien Cheng’s life during the Cultural Revolution.

Nien Cheng was kept imprisoned for over 6 years at Number One Detention house in Shanghai, from to During that time she was interrogated, beaten. Find books like Life and Death in Shanghai from the world’s largest community of readers. Goodreads members who liked Life and Death in Shanghai also lik.

Life and Death in Shanghai [Cheng Nien] on sylvaindez.com *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. This is a first-hand account of China's cultural revolution.

Life and Death in Shanghai: China under Mao’s Cultural Revolution

Nien Cheng, an anglophile and fluent English-speaker who worked for Shell in Shanghai under MaoCited by: Life and Death in Shanghai is the powerful story of Nien Cheng's imprisonment, of the deprivation she endured, of her heroic resistance, and of her quest for justice when she was released.

It is the story, too, of a country torn apart by the savage fight for power Mao Tse-tung launched in his campaign to topple party moderates/5.